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Co2 Piping Design


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#1 Mloukili

Mloukili

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 11:45 AM

Hi,
I have an application where I have to size CO2 piping to the seamer (can closing machine) in a brewery.
CO2 conditions:
Pressure: 30 psig
Temperature: ambient
Flow: one pipe 20 SCFM + another pipe at 100 SCFM
How should I proceed to size pipe diameter?
Should I consider it as compressed air and use the crane pressure loss table: consider 0.1 psig/100 ft and determine the diameter? Or can I use a certain velocity and then calculate the diameter.

I would appreciate if someone has a spreadsheet with those calculations

Regards,

#2 demank

demank

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 10:49 PM

For determining the desire of pipe diameter, you should know the velocity criteria, pressure drop criteria, etc...
After you get the required criteria, then you may calculate (with colebrook equation, AGA, Weymouth, PanHandle, etc equation for example) and selection the proper size of your pipe.

*Specially for the gas as compressible fluid, you should take care of change of physical properties by decreasing the pressure. (If the pipe is short, not long enough, it will be easier to determine the diameter).

#3 imran.idris

imran.idris

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 09:38 AM

Dear, in order to size pipe for the said application you need the following information gathered
1) Length of the pipe to be used
2) fittings involved in the piping network (piping network or isometric)
3) Allowable pressure drop (means final required pressure)

Just tell me the above data, and I'll let you know the pipe size ideal for your application.
You can also email the said data to my email imranidris@thepetrostreet.com
or visit me at site: http://forums.thepetrostreet.com/ if you have any further queries
regards,
imran




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