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Chemical Reactor -thumb Rule For Reactor Height To Diameter


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#1 Guest_Nattu_*

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 12:12 PM

I would like to know if there is any general thumb rule for stirred reactor height to diameter.

Thanks

#2 Geoffrey

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 06:17 AM

Here is a rule of thumb, that I found in a Excel workbook downloaded from the cheresources site, that has to do with drum vessels.

QUOTE
Optimum Length/Diameter ratio is usually 3, range is 2.5 to 5


Maybe it can help. I attach the workbook here.

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#3 pilot

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 05:14 AM

QUOTE (Geoffrey @ Sep 3 2007, 06:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here is a rule of thumb, that I found in a Excel workbook downloaded from the cheresources site, that has to do with drum vessels.

QUOTE
Optimum Length/Diameter ratio is usually 3, range is 2.5 to 5


Maybe it can help. I attach the workbook here.



Dear this excell file is not opening, Can you re-attch, its look like havingRead only & other errors....

#4 Guest_Nattu_*

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 06:15 AM

Thanks Geoffey!!

#5 joker1

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 04:08 PM

QUOTE (Nattu @ Aug 29 2007, 12:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would like to know if there is any general thumb rule for stirred reactor height to diameter.

Thanks


The L/D ratio depends on the process involved. For example for a boiling CSTR used for polymers (high viscosity) you need a low L/D (say 1:1) supplemented by a disengagement head space to avoid polymer entrainment/ add cold material to quench a runaway reaction. So you end up with L/D of 1.5-2.

Having a higher L/D may cause the agitator shaft to be beefed up.

Bottom line is you have to use engineering judgment.




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