Jump to content



Featured Articles

Check out the latest featured articles.

File Library

Check out the latest downloads available in the File Library.

New Article

Product Viscosity vs. Shear

Featured File

Vertical Tank Selection

New Blog Entry

Low Flow in Pipes- posted in Ankur's blog

2

Effect Of Present Of Methanol In Ethane Feed To Olefin Plants


2 replies to this topic
Share this topic:
| More

#1 h.eghbali

h.eghbali

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 20 posts

Posted 28 November 2021 - 07:38 AM

Dear all Hello.
I have a question. Would you please help me?
What is the effect of presence of methanol in ethane feed to olefin plants? 
And what is the maximum permissible methanol in ethane feed?
thanks in advance...


#2 Pilesar

Pilesar

    Gold Member

  • Members
  • 949 posts

Posted 29 November 2021 - 10:34 PM   Best Answer

Methanol is a contaminate containing oxygen. More CO is formed which can poison the acetylene converter catalyst. Oxygenates tend to increase gum formation, leading to problems downstream. Ethylene yields are affected because of the addition of oxygen radicals to the free radical mix of hydrocarbons in the cracking furnace. There will be enhanced risk of corrosion caused by the additional CO, CO2, methanol, formaldehyde, acids, etc, that are formed by the oxygen. Maximum methanol permissible is 'no more than necessary.' Biologically derived feedstocks containing oxygen compounds are cracked in some plants, so it can be done as long as corrosive compounds are carefully monitored.



#3 h.eghbali

h.eghbali

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 20 posts

Posted 01 December 2021 - 03:42 AM

Methanol is a contaminate containing oxygen. More CO is formed which can poison the acetylene converter catalyst. Oxygenates tend to increase gum formation, leading to problems downstream. Ethylene yields are affected because of the addition of oxygen radicals to the free radical mix of hydrocarbons in the cracking furnace. There will be enhanced risk of corrosion caused by the additional CO, CO2, methanol, formaldehyde, acids, etc, that are formed by the oxygen. Maximum methanol permissible is 'no more than necessary.' Biologically derived feedstocks containing oxygen compounds are cracked in some plants, so it can be done as long as corrosive compounds are carefully monitored.

Well described answer, thanks dear. I suppose you have an experience on olefin plants. thanks anyway...






Similar Topics