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Iso 28300 Venting Calculations

iso28300

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#1 Mikemak

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 08:37 AM

Good day all, I am new into this forum, My name is Mike, I require your help with the following topic, you can also point me in the right direction if possible

I am going through ISO28300, on the calculation of maximum flow rates for normal out-breathing, section 4.3.2.2.1, clause b and clause c Which says:

B) For products containing more volatile components or dissolved gases (e.g. Oil spiked with methane), perform a flash calculation and increase the out-breathing venting requirements accordingly

c) For products stored above 40 degC or with a vapour pressure greater than 5,0 kPa increase the out-breathing by the evaporation rate.

However, none of the venting codes mentions how to perform a flashing calculation or how to calculate the evaporation rate. Can anyone please help me with how I can go about solving these two problems?

Thanks in advance



#2 latexman

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 10:10 AM

Flash calculations and evaporation rates are basic Chemical Engineering skills I learned in college. Are you a ChE?

#3 gegio1960

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 10:14 AM

which is your stored fluid?



#4 breizh

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 05:18 PM

Hi,

I believe you got the answer above. Add to the fluid movement, the quantity flashed or evaporated. 

Do you have access to a simulator to perform flash calculation?

To get a meaningful answer you need to provide data about your fluid and operating conditions, etc.

Your standard is similar to API 521.

Good luck

Breizh 



#5 gegio1960

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 02:23 AM

breizh,

api 2000, not 521.

;-)



#6 breizh

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 02:31 AM

Yes , You are right.

Breizh 



#7 Mikemak

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 04:01 AM

Flash calculations and evaporation rates are basic Chemical Engineering skills I learned in college. Are you a ChE?

Thanks Latex man, I am a mechanical eng.



#8 Mikemak

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 04:02 AM

Hi,

I believe you got the answer above. Add to the fluid movement, the quantity flashed or evaporated. 

Do you have access to a simulator to perform flash calculation?

To get a meaningful answer you need to provide data about your fluid and operating conditions, etc.

Your standard is similar to API 521.

Good luck

Breizh 

Thanks breizh. I will go through the document.



#9 Mikemak

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 04:03 AM

which is your stored fluid?

Hi Gegio, I don't have a fluid yet, I want to understand how I can go about it when I face that situation.



#10 latexman

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Posted 23 February 2024 - 05:19 AM

Thanks Latex man, I am a mechanical eng.


I recommend the book I learned flash calculations and evaporation rates from, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering by McCabe and Smith.  I think the more recent editions have other authors; McCabe and Smith have passed on long ago.






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