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Waste Water

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#1 refluxraider

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Posted 14 April 2024 - 02:57 PM

Hello,

 

I am currently designing a process for the production of propylene glycol for my design project. We have chosen to purify acetol in a distillation column by separating acetol from a mixture containing water, methanol, ethanol and propanol. I am wondering how to deal with the wastewater from this distillation column. We have 218kmol/h of this wastewater so ideally would like to deal with this large amount on site so we can recycle it for use as grey water and for utilities. What are the most cost-effective options for managing this stream? We are trying to be economicaaly viable and seems many options are expensive. The composition is 99.1% water, 0.37% methanol, 0.19% ethanol, 0.3% propanol and 0.0028% acetol. There is also the option of sending the water off to a nearby treatment facility, however the goal of the design project is to be as sustainable as possible. 

 

Thank you for any help! 



#2 Pilesar

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Posted 14 April 2024 - 05:07 PM

That stream looks like a good candidate for biological treatment to me. After the bugs eat the alcohol, the water should be ready for discharge to environment.



#3 breizh

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Posted 14 April 2024 - 10:22 PM

Hi,

Check whether Fenton reaction works for you.

https://hal.science/...055369/document.

 

Note: work as an engineer and provide info in the relevant units:  m3/h, kg/h, mt/h 

 

Breizh



#4 shvet1

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Posted 14 April 2024 - 11:31 PM

What are the most cost-effective options for managing this stream?

Pump it to an open sea, ocean, or large river / reservoir or evaporate&infiltrate it in a non-flowing through pond - both have been being widely used practices all over the industry history.

 

When the environment is an issue most modern chemicals producers I am familiar with choose incineration or advanced bio-treatment.

https://a.co/d/gBF4U90

https://bit.ly/3UiQAkz

https://bit.ly/4awLYOv

 

What are the most cost-effective options for managing this stream? ... the goal of the design project is to be as sustainable as possible. 

Mutually exclusive. Most cost effective for beneficiaries is when others pay theirs bills.

 

Wastewater treatment is not a simple question and any option may be most economical depending on local conditions. Describe in details the location and surroundings.


Edited by shvet1, 15 April 2024 - 12:04 AM.


#5 refluxraider

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Posted 15 April 2024 - 03:46 AM

What are the most cost-effective options for managing this stream?

Pump it to an open sea, ocean, or large river / reservoir or evaporate&infiltrate it in a non-flowing through pond - both have been being widely used practices all over the industry history.

 

When the environment is an issue most modern chemicals producers I am familiar with choose incineration or advanced bio-treatment.

https://a.co/d/gBF4U90

https://bit.ly/3UiQAkz

https://bit.ly/4awLYOv

 

What are the most cost-effective options for managing this stream? ... the goal of the design project is to be as sustainable as possible. 

Mutually exclusive. Most cost effective for beneficiaries is when others pay theirs bills.

 

Wastewater treatment is not a simple question and any option may be most economical depending on local conditions. Describe in details the location and surroundings.

 

Hi, 

The plant is to be built in St Louis, Missouri, USA



#6 shvet1

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Posted 15 April 2024 - 04:15 AM

Hi, 

The plant is to be built in St Louis, Missouri, USA

 

 

https://bit.ly/3TYJa5B

 

The Industrial Wastewater Treatment Technology Database provides technology performance data from peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings, and government reports. IWTT can be used for many purposes including:
*investigating established and emerging treatment technologies
*identifying technologies that can treat a particular pollutant
*understanding the motivation behind installation of new treatment at an industrial facility

Edited by shvet1, 15 April 2024 - 04:16 AM.





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