Jump to content



Featured Articles

Check out the latest featured articles.

File Library

Check out the latest downloads available in the File Library.

New Article

Product Viscosity vs. Shear

Featured File

Vertical Tank Selection

New Blog Entry

Low Flow in Pipes- posted in Ankur's blog

How To Blend Gasoline


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
3 replies to this topic
Share this topic:
| More

#1 Econ

Econ

    Brand New Member

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 10 December 2014 - 12:27 PM

Hi guys,

 

I just started as a gasoline analyst at a trading firm. I want to learn how to blend gasoline.

 

What tips can you give me on the best route to take to learning blending?

 

I have a couple of books, you know the standard ones... pet refining in nontech language, and the pet ref tech & econ by gary/handwerk.

 

But, well, even after reading pet ref in nontech and reading parts of gary/handwerk, there are a few gaps just in terms of learning how to be a blender.

 

Any tips?



#2 Bobby Strain

Bobby Strain

    Gold Member

  • Members
  • 2,784 posts

Posted 10 December 2014 - 01:46 PM

All the blenders use software to accomplish this. Maybe this is where you should look.

 

Bobby



#3 P.K.Rao

P.K.Rao

    Gold Member

  • Members
  • 265 posts

Posted 11 December 2014 - 12:18 AM

It depends on what components you have and to what specifications you want to blend. You want to blend motor gasoline or aviation gasoline? The usual components of motor  gasoline are SR Naphtha, Catalytic reformate, FCC naphtha, VB naphtha, Isomerates, dimerate,  alkylates and oxygenates, You should have critical properties of all components like ASTM D 86 distillation, RVP. RON, MON, VL ration, etc. If you are having blending software, try making hypothetical blends for practice and confirm by actual testing. Take the blend that conforms to the specifications. If you  do not have  software, make paper blends conforming to specifications  The most  difficult property is RON/MON for blending because this property of components varies widely and is not arithmatically additive.  If you have an NIR spectrometer you can determine several properties at a time and save time Economics  is another angle which should not be overlooked (Quality Give Away). Visit the following websites which deal with blending and blending strategy.

  1. https://www.honeywel...marketing/case-  studies/WhitePaper_Valero_OptimizedGasolineBlending.       
  2. http://www.britannic...ine-blending   
  3. http://robertrapier....oline-blending/
  4. http://www.eprinc.or...                                                                                                                                                               


#4 Econ

Econ

    Brand New Member

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:16 PM

Thanks guys. Well I don't have access to software other than MS Excel. It's not my job to be a blender... I'm just trying to learn on the side.

 

Motor gasoline blending, not avgas.

 

More suggestions welcome please.






Similar Topics