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Volume Of Water


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#1 chemical82

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 05:34 PM

HiPlease can anyone help me , I want know how can I calculte volume of water in Horizontal cylinder tank, length = 10m , diameter = 2 m , height of water =0.5m .I want know what equation can I use it to calculate volume of water ?thank for all

#2 Nirav

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 09:19 PM

There are basic formula in textbooks to calculate what you need.
One of the books is Perry's Chemical engg. handbook.

What do you mean by "what are raw which calculate" ???

You can also go to following link for online calculations.
http://grapevine.abe.../vol/index.html

#3 chemical82

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 03:08 AM

thank nirav kholiya very much
I mean''what equation can I use it to calculate volume of water ?
thank you

#4 djack77494

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 07:28 AM

Chemical82,
There are several problems with your posting, some of which are reflected in your responses. You state that you have a horizontal tank, then provide its "height" of 10m - I think you mean its length. You say the diameter of the tank is 2m and the height of water in the tank is 2m. Aren't you just saying the tank is full? Then you give us an unneeded peice of information about the tank's [b]thickness[\b]. Overall, I think most readers are very confused by the statement of what seems like a simple problem.

If my assumptions, above, are correct, you want the volume of a full horizontal (vertical would be the same) vessel that is 2m diameter and 10m long. Use:

V = pi * d^2 * L / 4

the standard equation from geometry for finding the volume of a cylinder.
Doug

#5 chemical82

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 05:31 PM

thank djack77494 , you are right
iam very very sorry
the tank not full with water

#6 Adriaan

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 09:16 AM

Assuming that the tank is an actual cylinder (most aren't as the end plates are rarely flat) then the volume of water equals the cross section area of the water (which at < 50 % is called a CIRCLE SEGMENT) times the length of the cylinder. The following pair of equations give a very good approximation of the cross section area;

step 1: calculate the water level surface width S from the tank diameter and water level using

S = 2 x square root ( ( diameter - water level) x water level )

step 2: calculate the cross section (circle segment) area using

A = 2/3 x S x water level + water level to the power of three / ( 2 x S )

For levels over 50 % use the free space instead of the water level, then subtract A from A total (circle area) to get the water cross section area.

step 3: water volume = A x tank length



The attached Excel sheet is a simple calculator based on this logic.

Please note that this calculator will not work for a (nearly) full or empty tank (that gets you a DIVISION BY ZERO error). The sheet has two lines that deal with the > 50 % level inversion, they are in grey font.

#7 chemical82

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 04:06 AM

Thank you Adriaan
thank you very very much

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 04:20 AM

wasnt able to get the attached excel sheet. could you plz send it again

#9 sania

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 12:09 AM

Where is the sheet? Could you please upload it again for all of us.
Thankyou

#10 Art Montemayor

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 06:37 AM


I am responding to this thread out of pity.

I have, on a prior thread, already explained and furnished what I consider to be the necessary equations and developed worksheets to fully undertake the design of a process tank to hold and control a specific volume of liquid - be it a horizontal tank or a vertical tank - and with a variety of standard fabrication type of heads.

I have always place importance on chemical engineers being able to do this because of the obvious instrumentation and process inventory controls involved in the design of such tanks. I hope that this need is not taken lightly.

I hate lazy students but I hate lazy professional engineers even more. All that needs to be done is to use the search function on this Forum. There is also a similiar product for sale on this Forum - but that costs you money.

I hope the attached compressed Workbook does the job that is required and that the methodology and equations are fully understood - and they are referenced.

Attached File  Vessel_Volume.zip   467.78KB   368 downloads


#11 Bob LaMuro

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 02:31 PM

Art,

Thanks for spreadsheet. Excellent work.

Bob

QUOTE (Art Montemayor @ Jun 4 2007, 05:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am responding to this thread out of pity.

I have, on a prior thread, already explained and furnished what I consider to be the necessary equations and developed worksheets to fully undertake the design of a process tank to hold and control a specific volume of liquid - be it a horizontal tank or a vertical tank - and with a variety of standard fabrication type of heads.

I have always place importance on chemical engineers being able to do this because of the obvious instrumentation and process inventory controls involved in the design of such tanks. I hope that this need is not taken lightly.

I hate lazy students but I hate lazy professional engineers even more. All that needs to be done is to use the search function on this Forum. There is also a similiar product for sale on this Forum - but that costs you money.

I hope the attached compressed Workbook does the job that is required and that the methodology and equations are fully understood - and they are referenced.

Attached File  Vessel_Volume.zip   467.78KB   368 downloads


#12 proinwv

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 05:01 PM

Art, eloquent, I couldn't have said it better. Thanks.

Chemical82

Please look at the catagories next time you post. This was not the place to post such a question. The student section would have been more appropriate.




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