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Overflow Design


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#1 Nuhom

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 11:07 AM

Hi
I have a question re overflow design for a tank. We’re connecting a new tank to and existing tank with an interconnecting pipe so it operates at same level. The overflow connection for the new tank is higher than the existing tank. I want to pipe the overflow of new tank across to the existing tank and use the overflow of the existing to function as a common overflow for both tanks. I can’t pipe the overflow straight across because it is same level as the shell and cone weld seam. So I was going to run the overflow so it bends down, penetrates existing tank (at liquid level) and then bend it up again to discharge overflow at the same level as the existing tank overflow. Can anyone see any issues with this ?

#2 breizh

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 09:25 PM

Hi,

Would you please share a simple PFD , it will clarify your query ?

My view

Breizh 



#3 fallah

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 03:36 AM

Hi
I have a question re overflow design for a tank. We’re connecting a new tank to and existing tank with an interconnecting pipe so it operates at same level. The overflow connection for the new tank is higher than the existing tank. I want to pipe the overflow of new tank across to the existing tank and use the overflow of the existing to function as a common overflow for both tanks. I can’t pipe the overflow straight across because it is same level as the shell and cone weld seam. So I was going to run the overflow so it bends down, penetrates existing tank (at liquid level) and then bend it up again to discharge overflow at the same level as the existing tank overflow. Can anyone see any issues with this ?

 

Hi,

 

At first you should upload a sketch of the overflow system you described...



#4 Nuhom

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 04:58 AM

Hi, elevation drawing attached showing the main tank (11,000 mm diameter) which has an existing overflow about a 100mm from the top of the tank. I want to direct the overflow from the 2 x new tanks (4,600mm diamter) into the larger tank. The overflow on these tanks are at a slighly higher level but I find the only way to get it in the tank is to drop in and then pipe it up again (the "U" piece in the drawing). Hope this makes sense.

 

Thanks in advance.



#5 Nuhom

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 04:59 AM

sorry attachment attached.

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#6 breizh

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 06:51 AM

Hi ,

Let me ask why not having 2 separate overflows ?  

Where the overflow is directed ?  what kind of product is it ? 

On  maintenance point of view it could be interesting to be able to isolate one tank and continue the operation with the second one i.e  2 separate overflow and valve in between the tanks (interconnection) .

 

my view 

Breizh 






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