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Estimation Of Saturated Liquid Density




More than a year ago I had unilaterally made a post in the "Industrial Forums" sub-forum a post with the title "Estimation of Saturated Liquid Density" along with a spreadsheet. I had thought it was a pretty decent spreadsheet for calculating liquid densities below the critical temperature (saturated liquid) for some non-polar compounds. For reasons unknown the spreadsheet did not see many downloads although some modern process simulators use the "Rackett" equation for estimation of saturated liquid densities of highly non-polar liquids instead of equation of state (EOS) such as PR, SRK and BWR since the EOS method becomes unreliable as the compounds become more and more non-polar.

I do understand that there are many stand-alone thermophysical property simulators available free on the internet as well as any decent commercial property simulator worth it's name will have quite an extensive set of calculations for generating any thermophysical property for a given compound. However, I would like to point out that the USP of the spreadsheets I prepare are the equations which come along with the spreadsheets. Few, if any engineers take the trouble of representing all the backend equations that go in any calculation.

I am once again posting the spreadsheet, along with this blog entry. Another unique feature is that you can unlock this spreadsheet and add more non-polar or slightly polar compounds to the table in the "Example Calc" worksheet and modify the "array" range in the calculation cells to get values for the added compounds.

I would be happy to hear comments and suggestions from the readers.

PS:

The term non-polar has been extensively used in my blog entry and it is imperative that some definition of what non-polar be provided. A dictionary definition of non-polar compound is as follows:

"A compound composed of molecules that possess a symmetrical distribution of charge, so that no positive or negative poles exist, and that are not ionizable in solution; e.g., hydrocarbons".

Regards,
Ankur.

Download the spreadsheet in the Download section here:

http://www.cheresour...quid-densities/




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