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Axial Flow Pump


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#1 Vivekananda

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 07:08 AM

Hello everyone,

 

I would like to understand how the axial thrust is developed in an axial flow pump which is placed vertically. What will be the direction of the axial thrust in the same?

 

Thanks,

 Vivekananda


Edited by Vivekananda, 06 March 2019 - 07:10 AM.


#2 thorium90

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 03:50 AM

I would think the thrust would be in the direction opposite to the fluid flow wouldn't it?

 

Is there a concern for the thrust?



#3 Vivekananda

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 04:50 AM

Thank you thorium90.

 

Yes, In order to accommodate a thrust bearings. Becasue there are other heavy components mounted on top of it.



#4 thorium90

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 05:03 AM

I thought the manufacturer would have included thrust bearings when they sold the pump. You shouldn't have to change the bearings in the pump to accommodate more thrust right?

Why would something external to the pump be a factor to consider in the thrust bearing load in the pump? The bearing is only for the rotating shaft, unless you place heavy something on the rotating shaft itself?

Are you placing something heavy on the pump casing or placing something on the spinning shaft?

Anyhow, is there a way to place this heavy item somewhere else, say a structural frame or concrete wall so that you do not need to modify the pump bearings? I would think it is advisable to put stuff on the support structure and not use the pump to support stuff. Its the same thing for pipes, where you never use the pump to support the pipes, you always support the pipes with pipe supports, not with the pump.


Edited by thorium90, 09 March 2019 - 05:06 AM.


#5 Vivekananda

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 05:52 AM

I agree to everything you just said regarding structures to take care of the other loads.

 

The concern is about me trying to understand the requirement of thrust bearing when the axial thrust is very large, say 1000N. What is to be done in order to take care of this type of heavy axial thrust?



#6 thorium90

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 06:02 AM

I see. Bearings is an entire can of topics on its own. Tilting pad, oil, rollers, etc etc...

Unfortunately, I'm not a bearing expert. I was thinking more to prevent it first, then only when absolutely necessary then modify. 

Perhaps a mechanical expert or the vendor themselves will be more appropriate to answer your queries.



#7 Art Montemayor

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 05:05 PM

Thorium90 advice and comments are correct in my opinion.  Please refer to the attached sketch.

 

Taper roller bearings (such as Timken developed) would be a perfect application for this pump setup - except that in my experience they were - and still are - specific only to low speed shaft applications.  An axial pump is a very high speed pump.

 

 

Attached File  Typical Axial Pump Installation.docx   28.82KB   6 downloads






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