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Pumps, One Question Regarding Sizing

pumps sizing pump hydraulics oil and gas pump calculation

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#1 Lorean

Lorean

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 09:51 AM

So i have to size pump, there is a tank A which sends liquid to centrifugal pump A, pump A delivered this liquid to tank B.
There is also tank C that sends liquid to pump C that delivers liquid to tank D.
Now according to new design, discharge of pump A will be connected to suction of pump C. How to find discharge pressure of pump A(which is the suction pressure of pump C)?
The way i calculated was : i calculated suction of pump A, then used pump curve, found rated head, converted to bar, and aded up to suction pressure got the discharge pressure of pump A. Then i used the discharge pressure of pump A, substracted friction loses of the pipe between pump A and C, took static elevation into account, and thus found suction pressure of pump C. Is it a right way to size pump? Could you please help? Both of them are centrifugal pumps

#2 Subhendu

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 10:07 AM

The problem is not well defined, a sketch would have been better to understand. I assume that what you described in the first paragraph were the old design, where you have the pump curve for Pump A. Also, I assume that now pump A  acts as a booster pump for pump C and the pump A no longer delivers the liquid to tank B. Also, there is no connection from tank C to pump C. If these assumptions are right then what you have done is perfectly right, discharge pressure of pump A will be the suction pressure of pump C, after adjusting for line/instrument frictional loss and static head.  



#3 fallah

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 03:12 AM

So i have to size pump, there is a tank A which sends liquid to centrifugal pump A, pump A delivered this liquid to tank B.
There is also tank C that sends liquid to pump C that delivers liquid to tank D.
Now according to new design, discharge of pump A will be connected to suction of pump C. How to find discharge pressure of pump A(which is the suction pressure of pump C)?
The way i calculated was : i calculated suction of pump A, then used pump curve, found rated head, converted to bar, and aded up to suction pressure got the discharge pressure of pump A. Then i used the discharge pressure of pump A, substracted friction loses of the pipe between pump A and C, took static elevation into account, and thus found suction pressure of pump C. Is it a right way to size pump? Could you please help? Both of them are centrifugal pumps

 

Hi,

 

As Subhendu well defined a sketch of the system you described will help to provide better reply...






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