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Breather Valves


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#1 ayan_dg

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 03:36 AM

What is the difference between breather valves & Pressure Vacuum relief valves. When to use what ?

#2 Art Montemayor

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 06:09 AM

The definition and detailed explanation of breather valves & Pressure Vacuum relief valves - as well as all other related storage tank relief and blanketing items are explained in my Excel workbook that I have posted and made available many times in the past. I even include illustrations and drawings of each item as well as a compete copy of Paul Ostand's series of articles on tank blanketing.

You should download a copy and study it.



#3 ayan_dg

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 06:27 AM

QUOTE (Art Montemayor @ Sep 19 2008, 07:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The definition and detailed explanation of breather valves & Pressure Vacuum relief valves - as well as all other related storage tank relief and blanketing items are explained in my Excel workbook that I have posted and made available many times in the past. I even include illustrations and drawings of each item as well as a compete copy of Paul Ostand's series of articles on tank blanketing.

You should download a copy and study it.


Thanks Art.
I want another favour from you. Can you send me the excel spreadsheet which you have developed for sizing breather valves. My email Id is

dasgupta_ayan@yahoo.com

Thanks again

#4 Art Montemayor

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 08:44 AM

Ayan:

You'll never develop into a dependable and self-reliant professional engineer until you get off your backside and start doing some research work yourself - especially when I've already done all the work and told you where it is. Read my prior post again - carefully this time, and concentrate on what I wrote:

"......related storage tank relief and blanketing items are explained in my Excel workbook that I have posted and made available many times in the past. ......download a copy and study it."

USE YOUR INGENUITY BY EMPLOYING THE "SEARCH" BUTTON FOUND AT THE TOP OF THIS FORUM LISTING. The Search feature is your tool to find what has already been done for you and others. Exploit it to your benefit. We can feed you, but don't expect us to chew and digest the food for you. You have to do some work yourself. That, after all, is the largest portion of an engineer's scope of work in normal life.


I hope you find the .zip file which has multiple workbooks in it, all dealing with what you have to know as an engineer. This is the best help that I can give to teach an engineering student how to become a professional engineer in the future. Good Luck.

#5 ayan_dg

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 10:54 PM

QUOTE (Art Montemayor @ Sep 19 2008, 09:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ayan:

You'll never develop into a dependable and self-reliant professional engineer until you get off your backside and start doing some research work yourself - especially when I've already done all the work and told you where it is. Read my prior post again - carefully this time, and concentrate on what I wrote:

"......related storage tank relief and blanketing items are explained in my Excel workbook that I have posted and made available many times in the past. ......download a copy and study it."

USE YOUR INGENUITY BY EMPLOYING THE "SEARCH" BUTTON FOUND AT THE TOP OF THIS FORUM LISTING. The Search feature is your tool to find what has already been done for you and others. Exploit it to your benefit. We can feed you, but don't expect us to chew and digest the food for you. You have to do some work yourself. That, after all, is the largest portion of an engineer's scope of work in normal life.


I hope you find the .zip file which has multiple workbooks in it, all dealing with what you have to know as an engineer. This is the best help that I can give to teach an engineering student how to become a professional engineer in the future. Good Luck.



Thanks Art . I got it!. It is great




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