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Heat Balance For A Steam Reformer Unit


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#51 PingPong

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:02 PM

No, is not correct.

 

The correct calculation of steam in PSA feed gas is:

 

(115.0159 - 31.15686) * 0.004097 / (1 - 0.004097) = ..............kmol/h



#52 MurtazaHakim

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 05:04 AM

We referred to the sources suggested by you and found that some of the data had temperature constraints so we searched from other sources.

 

We have obtained the values of Henry's constant from NIST website and have used the temperature dependence correlation to get the values of those constants at other temperatures.

 

Kindly have a look at the attached file and suggest the further treatment required.

 

 

Attached Files



#53 ravindra@096

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 05:13 AM

 

 

(115.0159 - 31.15686) * 0.004097 / (1 - 0.004097) = ..............kmol/h

 

  Can you please explain how did you arrive at this formula ?


Edited by ravindra@096, 20 January 2018 - 05:28 AM.


#54 PingPong

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 06:09 AM

Murtaza, your calculated values are correct but note that the units of measurement for kH on NIST website are mol/kg.bar not mol/l.atm as you are reporting. Difference is small but nevertheless.

 

Note also that the third column heading in your table should read -ΔsolH/R

 

Ravindra, the formule simply takes the dry gas part, divides it by its mole fraction (to give total PSA gas feed), and multiplies that by water vapor mole fraction.


Edited by PingPong, 21 January 2018 - 06:11 AM.


#55 breizh

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:00 AM

Hi ,

 Hope this document is going to help you .

Breizh

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#56 MurtazaHakim

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Posted Yesterday, 03:36 AM

According to Henry’s law, the solubility of a gas in the solvent is equal to the product of Henry’s law constant and the partial pressure of the gas in the system. Having known the Henry constants of all the constituent gases, we require the partial pressure of all the gases to compute their solubility.

 

Considering the Dalton’s law of partial pressure, we need the total pressure of the system to calculate the partial pressure of each gas since we have the mole fractions of individual gases in the system.

 

What is the temperature and pressure of the system(condenser) ?



#57 PingPong

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Posted Yesterday, 04:50 AM

The temperature is whatever you choose it to be, Depends on the temperature of the cooling medium(s) available.

 

The pressure I already indicated before as typically 2 - 2.5 bar lower than the reformer furnace outlet pressure.



#58 MurtazaHakim

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Posted Yesterday, 10:32 AM

I have calculated the amount of shifted gas components dissolved in the condensate considering the operating temperature and pressure of the condenser to be 45 degrees Celsius and 18 bar.Kindly have a look at an image attached below.

Attached Files






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